This home in Nashik is a pastel lover’s dream

Designed by Ladlab, this home in Nashik spread over 900 square-feet lets colours and light reign supreme.
The austerity throughout the living space is imbued with personality.
Yadnyesh Joshi

In this Nashik city apartment by Ladlab, colour reigns supreme. Not much more than 900 square-feet, this apartment was the second home for a theatre actor and his wife. In line with the client’s affinity for a minimal aesthetic with a few stand-out moments, architects Sagar and Saniya took inspiration from the rare phenomenon of blooms in a desert.

The architects set the tone from the moment you step into the living room—a sizable space reflecting the shades of a desert (sand, beige, greys, and whites). The staunch monochrome palette soaks up the sun from large east-facing windows making the space feel expansive and bright. Abstract brush strokes against a grey canvas form a linear directional flooring that runs through the communal areas: living room, dining, kitchen, and balcony. The composed palette is softened by a stippled round charcoal carpet and a pair of organically-shaped customized coffee tables in mango wood. The combination feels unexpected but somehow harmonious. “We always seek a balance between masculine and feminine, old and new, curved and straight lines. It’s always fun to throw contrasts together and see what comes out,” remarks Sagar.

Also read: A minimalist Bengaluru home with a millennial pink twist

In the living space, the softness and intensity evoked by the striated grey flooring and grey sofa are balanced by custom furniture from local artisans, brown sheers, and floor lamps from IKEA India.

Yadnyesh Joshi

For the living room to appear spacious, all the walls are washed in a soft grey with striated flooring. Signature elements are highlighted in white: a sleek television console, shelves, and both archways. The architects started off with a neutral base and added colours in layers as they went. Heavily textured sand-coloured fabric woven to resemble the formation of sand dunes and a corner dark-tan leather armchair calibrate the room’s neutral, more formal elements.

Archways are punctuated into the wall, helping one space transition into another. Beside the archway, floating glass shelves in a staggered pattern are held in place with a compact MS framework system. Softened on the corners and cantilevered on both sides, the tinted brown glass shelves and crisp white frames form a striking composition against the soft grey wall.

Yadnyesh Joshi

The shelves feature a balanced and minimal composition of ceramic vases, clay urns, travel memorabilia, and pots with trailing creepers, bought from IKEA India, Ikai Asai, and The Osmos Studio.

Yadnyesh Joshi

The hallway linking the living room to the open dining and kitchen is hand painted in a delicate floral pattern by fine artist Salonee Thakre. The floral pattern has a mix of pastel pinks, lavender, greens, and burnt oranges, reflecting the unusual blooms you find in deserts. The delicate metal framework for the table and dining chairs is powder-coated in crisp white. To unify the space, the dining seats are upholstered in a cloudy grey, offsetting the colour of the floor. The kitchen is tucked beside the archway and has pale cereal pink shutters with concealed white handles, making a subtle nod to the florals on the dining feature wall.

Also read: This Bhopal home plays with colour palettes to achieve comfort and balance

A cannonball tree inspired the artwork in full bloom, and the dining table was positioned under it to suggest sitting under the canopy of a tree and having a meal. Designed to camouflage with the wall, the branched globe light from LightHub hangs above.

Yadnyesh Joshi

Mirroring the archway is another one on the same axis—a single brushed-brass wall light from The Lighthub highlighting the grooves inset within the arch.

Yadnyesh Joshi

The kitchen flaunts a powdery colour palette, achieving a sense of freshness. White vitrified countertop, soft-fluted backsplash, and cereal pink shutters reaffirm a Notting Hill aesthetic.

Yadnyesh Joshi

A masculine palette is deployed in the main bedroom—walnut wood-finished tiles from Nexion, a matt grey storage system with lacquered black handles, and walls washed in a soft grey. The wardrobes, loft storage, and curtains extend to the ceiling, making the room feel larger.

A walnut study desk is paired with a chestnut brown upholstered pinboard. Antique African sculptures sit atop the shelf.

Yadnyesh Joshi

Ladlab designed a floating king-size bed tucked into the storage alcove paired with a long platform. The final touch was the addition of a deep mustard cushioned headboard, with a study nook tucked into a niche right opposite.

Textured laminate from Merino Laminates in black, brown, and grey tones creates an atmosphere of subtle decadence, enhanced by an upholstered mustard headboard.

Yadnyesh Joshi

The same inventive use of colour continues in the guest bedroom. Windows run along the entire length of the room, wrapping it on two sides with tall pearl-white sheers. An elliptical cherry red upholstered headboard enhances a floating bed made in wood. Oakwood vitrified floor tiles and an umbrella tree glisten in the natural light. The guest room has glossy notes in the form of polished brass table lamps, door knobs, and ceiling lights.

Ribbed beige bed linen from La Casa India dresses the bed, and a custom totem-shaped nightstand crafted in mango wood complements the gentle elliptical curves of the headboard.

Yadnyesh Joshi

A sculptural headboard in cherry red injects colour against a neutral bedroom backdrop.

Yadnyesh Joshi

This Nashik apartment is an experimental take on colour blocking and clever details, prompting small spaces to appear larger. “We tried to create a constant modulation between composition, pops of colour, and a simplified layout orchestrating a level of fluid movement which washes through the home,” says Saniya.

Also read: 5 ways to use a soothing neutral colour scheme in your home